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Ghassan Kridli

Interim Dean and Professor
College of Engineering and Computer Science

The last year has been marked with change. At the College of Engineering and Computer Science (CECS), we transitioned to remote learning in a matter of days and have remained as flexible as possible through these unpredictable months. Another big change is Dean Tony England’s transition toward retirement. His vision transformed CECS and prepared us to think quickly in the face of a pandemic. As a professor and interim dean, I look forward to carrying on Dean England’s work to ensure success for every current and future CECS student.

In the short term, we’ve focused on delivering the same high quality of education. In the long term, the academic success of our students and the professional successes of our graduates is our key priority. This year, we have been approved to launch a National Academy of Engineering Grand Challenges Scholars Program (GCSP) for our undergraduate students. The program is built with a multi-disciplinary approach and projects that address real-life challenges. Instead of focusing solely on the technical aspect of engineering problems, the GCSP expects undergraduate students to consider a problem through multiple lenses. This year, students can use the challenges of the pandemic as opportunities for practical problem-solving in a virtual setting. It’s a unique time for CECS students, but it also highlights our world’s need for innovative thinkers like them.

While we must adapt to the present, the long term vision for student success is what drives us. Dean England’s work has already made an impact. His contributions include:

  • Ingraining a culture of research that values both fundamental research and translational research to support our partners.
  • Strengthening our programs through greater emphasis on experiential learning and the use of the “design, build, test, improve” approach. This was put into practice with student-centered buildings and spaces like the Student Team Project Space, the Maker’s Space, and the new Engineering Lab Building (ELB).
  • Focusing on diversity, equity, and inclusion to create the next generation of engineers, especially in underrepresented populations. Through his vision, we’ve seen steady growth in the number of female students. CECS has also gone from four to thirteen full-time faculty members who are women.

The impact of Tony’s work will be felt for years, but there’s still work to be done, and we need your help.

We’re continuing to partner with industry locally, and expanding our connections nationally. This means increasing research, serving societal needs, and educating students in core and emerging fields like bioengineering, cybersecurity, data science, human-centered engineering design, and robotics engineering, with additional programs being explored.

This winter, the Engineering Lab Building will open. As construction nears completion, the excitement of utilizing the ELB was partially hampered by the impact of the pandemic on funding for labs. As a result, we still need support to outfit some of our labs so we can deliver the experiential education that employers expect of UM-Dearborn engineers and computer scientists.

There are many ways you can support students at CECS. With a gift, you can provide scholarships that make a degree attainable. You can support senior design projects and projects for the GCSP. Or help outfit the ELB with industry-standard technology, giving our students the best learning spaces. Or give back as a mentor, building relationships with students that will make their degree go even farther. 

It’s been a challenging year, but our priorities haven’t changed. We can only ensure student success with your support. Please invest in the future of CECS and our students with your gift today.

Sincerely,

Ghassan Kridli
Interim Dean and Professor

 

In the short term, we’ve focused on delivering the same high quality of education. In the long term, the academic success of our students and the professional successes of our graduates is our key priority. This year, we have been approved to launch a National Academy of Engineering Grand Challenges Scholars Program (GCSP) for our undergraduate students. The program is built with a multi-disciplinary approach and projects that address real-life challenges. Instead of focusing solely on the technical aspect of engineering problems, the GCSP expects undergraduate students to consider a problem through multiple lenses. This year, students can use the challenges of the pandemic as opportunities for practical problem-solving in a virtual setting. It’s a unique time for CECS students, but it also highlights our world’s need for innovative thinkers like them.

While we must adapt to the present, the long term vision for student success is what drives us. Dean England’s work has already made an impact. His contributions include:

  • Ingraining a culture of research that values both fundamental research and translational research to support our partners.
  • Strengthening our programs through greater emphasis on experiential learning and the use of the “design, build, test, improve” approach. This was put into practice with student-centered buildings and spaces like the Student Team Project Space, the Maker’s Space, and the new Engineering Lab Building (ELB).
  • Focusing on diversity, equity, and inclusion to create the next generation of engineers, especially in underrepresented populations. Through his vision, we’ve seen steady growth in the number of female students. CECS has also gone from four to thirteen full-time faculty members who are women.

The impact of Tony’s work will be felt for years, but there’s still work to be done, and we need your help.

We’re continuing to partner with industry locally, and expanding our connections nationally. This means increasing research, serving societal needs, and educating students in core and emerging fields like bioengineering, cybersecurity, data science, human-centered engineering design, and robotics engineering, with additional programs being explored.

This winter, the Engineering Lab Building will open. As construction nears completion, the excitement of utilizing the ELB was partially hampered by the impact of the pandemic on funding for labs. As a result, we still need support to outfit some of our labs so we can deliver the experiential education that employers expect of UM-Dearborn engineers and computer scientists.

There are many ways you can support students at CECS. With a gift, you can provide scholarships that make a degree attainable. You can support senior design projects and projects for the GCSP. Or help outfit the ELB with industry-standard technology, giving our students the best learning spaces. Or give back as a mentor, building relationships with students that will make their degree go even farther. 

It’s been a challenging year, but our priorities haven’t changed. We can only ensure student success with your support. Please invest in the future of CECS and our students with your gift today.

Sincerely,

Ghassan Kridli
Interim Dean and Professor

 

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