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Alec D. Gallimore, Ph.D.

Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering, Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Professor of Engineering, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor
Michigan Engineering

As you read this letter I predict you are experiencing many feelings as we near the end of this whirlwind year. Our collective community has faced many challenges and will undoubtedly face additional uncertainty in the coming year. We deeply value our extended community of alumni and donors who have been with us every step of the way, showing support and generosity at every turn.

At Michigan Engineering we strive to develop intellectually curious and socially conscious minds, create collaborative solutions to societal problems and promote an inclusive and innovative community of service, all for the common good.

Here are a few examples in progress, as of this writing.

INTELLECTUALLY CURIOUS AND SOCIALLY CONSCIOUS MINDS

Last year, undergraduate senior Mackenzie Warwick and administrative assistant Jennifer Melms proposed the idea of a prize competition to Todd Allen, Glenn F. and Gladys H. Knoll Department Chair of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS). Professor Allen reached out to Bret Kugelmass, managing director of the Energy Impact Center in Washington, D.C. The Nuclear Energy Grand Challenge was born. Open to any U-M student, it aimed to spark team business plan proposals to reimagine how to convert nuclear waste into products. Professionals from the nuclear, policy, education and other sectors provided teams with guidance. The winning team, SustainiUM, composed of NERS, Design Science and School for Environment and Sustainability students, proposed to turn sewage sludge and nuclear waste into sustainable biomass. It earned the $17,000 grand prize.

COLLABORATIVE SOLUTIONS TO SOCIETAL PROBLEMS

Sherif El-Tawil, Antoine E. Naaman Collegiate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, developed the Interdependencies in Community Resilience (ICoR) project to attack the growing number and cost of natural disasters. By overcoming academic silos, assembling data, and developing a computational platform researchers from different disciplines can use to plug into their models, simultaneously researchers can see system interactions. The research team creates 3D visual simulations that can run in real-time and improve public understanding. One recent model computed by Ph.D. student Ahmed Abdelhady portrays the effect of strong winds on a neighborhood of houses. Professor El-Tawil has described that one solution might cost $5 million and would improve community resilience by five percent, while another solution could cost $1 million and would improve resilience by 10 percent. Communities would be better equipped to make informed, responsible decisions about proposed improvements.

INCLUSIVE AND INNOVATIVE COMMUNITY OF SERVICE

Nexus, Michigan Engineering’s home for online and professional education, is partnering with HackerU, the world’s premier cybersecurity and digital skills center of excellence, to launch a new online Cybersecurity Professional Bootcamp. The bootcamp will help working professionals to begin a cybersecurity career in less than one year. Training will feature live, “hands-on,” virtual learning laboratories. Students at Michigan Engineering and residents of Ann Arbor and metro Detroit communities now have access to a 30-hour introductory course, as well as more than 400 hours of curriculum tailored to today’s job market. Based on FBI and Insurance Information Institute data, the state of Michigan was ranked No. 1 in cybercrime complaints with nearly 202 per 100,000 persons.

I also have no doubt that you, our donors and our accomplished network of 85,000+ Michigan Engineering alumni, will remain a source of pride for our community: from our first-year learners to our rising faculty to our seasoned staff. We salute your achievements. We hope, in turn, that we are making you proud of Michigan Engineering.

What lies ahead is not clear. Yet, whatever societal challenges we face, Michigan Engineers will have a role in solving them. Thank you for demonstrating the imagination, resiliency and loyalty of the Leaders and Best.

Stay safe and Go Blue!

Sincerely,

Alec D. Gallimore Signature

Alec D. Gallimore, Ph.D.
Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering
Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Professor of Engineering
Arthur F. Thurnau Professor

P.S. Please help us continue to serve the common good with a gift today.

 

At Michigan Engineering we strive to develop intellectually curious and socially conscious minds, create collaborative solutions to societal problems and promote an inclusive and innovative community of service, all for the common good.

Here are a few examples in progress, as of this writing.

INTELLECTUALLY CURIOUS AND SOCIALLY CONSCIOUS MINDS

Last year, undergraduate senior Mackenzie Warwick and administrative assistant Jennifer Melms proposed the idea of a prize competition to Todd Allen, Glenn F. and Gladys H. Knoll Department Chair of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS). Professor Allen reached out to Bret Kugelmass, managing director of the Energy Impact Center in Washington, D.C. The Nuclear Energy Grand Challenge was born. Open to any U-M student, it aimed to spark team business plan proposals to reimagine how to convert nuclear waste into products. Professionals from the nuclear, policy, education and other sectors provided teams with guidance. The winning team, SustainiUM, composed of NERS, Design Science and School for Environment and Sustainability students, proposed to turn sewage sludge and nuclear waste into sustainable biomass. It earned the $17,000 grand prize.

COLLABORATIVE SOLUTIONS TO SOCIETAL PROBLEMS

Sherif El-Tawil, Antoine E. Naaman Collegiate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, developed the Interdependencies in Community Resilience (ICoR) project to attack the growing number and cost of natural disasters. By overcoming academic silos, assembling data, and developing a computational platform researchers from different disciplines can use to plug into their models, simultaneously researchers can see system interactions. The research team creates 3D visual simulations that can run in real-time and improve public understanding. One recent model computed by Ph.D. student Ahmed Abdelhady portrays the effect of strong winds on a neighborhood of houses. Professor El-Tawil has described that one solution might cost $5 million and would improve community resilience by five percent, while another solution could cost $1 million and would improve resilience by 10 percent. Communities would be better equipped to make informed, responsible decisions about proposed improvements.

INCLUSIVE AND INNOVATIVE COMMUNITY OF SERVICE

Nexus, Michigan Engineering’s home for online and professional education, is partnering with HackerU, the world’s premier cybersecurity and digital skills center of excellence, to launch a new online Cybersecurity Professional Bootcamp. The bootcamp will help working professionals to begin a cybersecurity career in less than one year. Training will feature live, “hands-on,” virtual learning laboratories. Students at Michigan Engineering and residents of Ann Arbor and metro Detroit communities now have access to a 30-hour introductory course, as well as more than 400 hours of curriculum tailored to today’s job market. Based on FBI and Insurance Information Institute data, the state of Michigan was ranked No. 1 in cybercrime complaints with nearly 202 per 100,000 persons.

I also have no doubt that you, our donors and our accomplished network of 85,000+ Michigan Engineering alumni, will remain a source of pride for our community: from our first-year learners to our rising faculty to our seasoned staff. We salute your achievements. We hope, in turn, that we are making you proud of Michigan Engineering.

What lies ahead is not clear. Yet, whatever societal challenges we face, Michigan Engineers will have a role in solving them. Thank you for demonstrating the imagination, resiliency and loyalty of the Leaders and Best.

Stay safe and Go Blue!

Sincerely,

Alec D. Gallimore Signature

Alec D. Gallimore, Ph.D.
Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering
Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Professor of Engineering
Arthur F. Thurnau Professor

P.S. Please help us continue to serve the common good with a gift today.

 

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