Portrait of Dean Gallimore ENG Logo

Alec D. Gallimore, Ph.D.

Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering
Michigan Engineering

Like many of you, students, staff and faculty members have faced significant challenges over the last twenty months. Our community responded with resilience and grace, and I am continually impressed by our collective agility, grit and commitment to serving the common good.

Over the course of the pandemic, we have been hard at work providing solutions including testing wastewater for COVID-19 outbreaks, studying the dispersion of aerosols in dental offices and public transportation, and discovering innovative ways to decontaminate personal protective equipment for medical staff. This work is made possible by generous support from our extended community of donors and alumni. Please give today to help our engineers find collaborative solutions to today’s most challenging problems.

In March, we officially opened the 134,000-square-foot Ford Motor Company Robotics Building, the new hub for the Michigan Robotics Institute. As robots and autonomous systems are poised to become part of our everyday lives, this one-of-a-kind facility includes a Mars yard for rover testing, a robot playground for testing walking robots, a three-story, indoor fly zone for autonomous aerial vehicles, several high-bay garages for self-driving cars, and a makerspace to hammer out–or 3D print–robotics hardware. Here Michigan Engineers will develop robots and roboticists who make lives better, keep people safer and push the robotics field, and engineering more broadly, to become equity-centered.

Recently, we launched two major institutes: the Michigan Space Institute and the Michigan Materials Research Institute. The Space Institute allows us to maintain and grow our place as a premier academic institution for space-related research, education and outreach. It will advance our world leadership in space activities scientifically, technically, socially and commercially. The focus of the institute includes conducting research from space, designing systems to operate in space and allowing humans to live in space. The Michigan Materials Research Institute will “catalyze” Michigan’s reputation as the best university in the US for engineered materials research, and will focus on addressing grand challenges identified by the National Academy of Engineering, including low-cost solar power, advanced medicine and re-engineered urban infrastructure.

Said to put the United States back on the map of high-power laser facilities, the three-petawatt ZEUS laser at the University of Michigan has been awarded $18.5 million by the National Science Foundation to establish it as a federally funded international user facility. Its approach will simulate a laser that is roughly a million times more powerful than its three petawatts. ZEUS primarily will be used to study extreme plasmas, a state of matter in which electrons break free of their atoms, forming what amounts to charged gases. Experiments at the facility are expected to contribute to the understanding of how the universe operates at the subatomic level, how astrophysical phenomena such as jets can be produced by black holes, how materials change on extremely fast timescales, and to the development of smaller and more efficient particle accelerators for medical imaging and treatment.

Michigan Engineering’s innovative approaches extend beyond research to the classroom. Recently, we established an experiential learning framework to encourage undergraduate students, beginning in their first year, to intentionally explore opportunities, engage meaningfully in experiences, reflect on what they have learned, and communicate the value of the core competencies they develop. The framework includes assessment resources for course instructors and student organization advisors as well as an app for students.

Our world has changed in significant ways. The need for well-trained engineers, capable of affecting positive change, has never been greater. Your gift to Michigan Engineering will help provide breakthrough engineering that will change lives for the better. You can help make an impact via these strategic funds:

  • The Michigan Engineering Fund supports the College’s highest priority initiatives. It provides seed money for faculty to collaborate with each other and launch new programs, funding for student organizations and teams to purchase equipment and travel to national competitions, and resources for students to graduate with the skills necessary to work in the global STEM workforce.
  • The Michigan Engineering Fund – Scholarships provides over $450,000 in annual need- and merit-based scholarships.
  • The Engineering Student Emergency Fund enables the College to support our students’ most urgent needs, including technology, health and wellness, transportation and more.
  • The Engineering Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Initiatives Fund helps create a vibrant and inclusive climate within the College by providing opportunities for education and by providing opportunities for all members of our community to seek their full potential.

Donor support makes an immediate and positive impact on our engineering community by enabling groundbreaking research and opportunities for the next generation of engineers. I invite you to show your support with a gift today.

Whether you give every month or once per year, your support ensures that Michigan Engineering sets the standard for interdisciplinary research and educational excellence.

Sincerely,

Alec D. Gallimore Signature

Alec D. Gallimore, Ph.D.
Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering
Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Professor of Engineering
Arthur F. Thurnau Professor

 

 

Over the course of the pandemic, we have been hard at work providing solutions including testing wastewater for COVID-19 outbreaks, studying the dispersion of aerosols in dental offices and public transportation, and discovering innovative ways to decontaminate personal protective equipment for medical staff. This work is made possible by generous support from our extended community of donors and alumni. Please give today to help our engineers find collaborative solutions to today’s most challenging problems.

In March, we officially opened the 134,000-square-foot Ford Motor Company Robotics Building, the new hub for the Michigan Robotics Institute. As robots and autonomous systems are poised to become part of our everyday lives, this one-of-a-kind facility includes a Mars yard for rover testing, a robot playground for testing walking robots, a three-story, indoor fly zone for autonomous aerial vehicles, several high-bay garages for self-driving cars, and a makerspace to hammer out–or 3D print–robotics hardware. Here Michigan Engineers will develop robots and roboticists who make lives better, keep people safer and push the robotics field, and engineering more broadly, to become equity-centered.

Recently, we launched two major institutes: the Michigan Space Institute and the Michigan Materials Research Institute. The Space Institute allows us to maintain and grow our place as a premier academic institution for space-related research, education and outreach. It will advance our world leadership in space activities scientifically, technically, socially and commercially. The focus of the institute includes conducting research from space, designing systems to operate in space and allowing humans to live in space. The Michigan Materials Research Institute will “catalyze” Michigan’s reputation as the best university in the US for engineered materials research, and will focus on addressing grand challenges identified by the National Academy of Engineering, including low-cost solar power, advanced medicine and re-engineered urban infrastructure.

Said to put the United States back on the map of high-power laser facilities, the three-petawatt ZEUS laser at the University of Michigan has been awarded $18.5 million by the National Science Foundation to establish it as a federally funded international user facility. Its approach will simulate a laser that is roughly a million times more powerful than its three petawatts. ZEUS primarily will be used to study extreme plasmas, a state of matter in which electrons break free of their atoms, forming what amounts to charged gases. Experiments at the facility are expected to contribute to the understanding of how the universe operates at the subatomic level, how astrophysical phenomena such as jets can be produced by black holes, how materials change on extremely fast timescales, and to the development of smaller and more efficient particle accelerators for medical imaging and treatment.

Michigan Engineering’s innovative approaches extend beyond research to the classroom. Recently, we established an experiential learning framework to encourage undergraduate students, beginning in their first year, to intentionally explore opportunities, engage meaningfully in experiences, reflect on what they have learned, and communicate the value of the core competencies they develop. The framework includes assessment resources for course instructors and student organization advisors as well as an app for students.

Our world has changed in significant ways. The need for well-trained engineers, capable of affecting positive change, has never been greater. Your gift to Michigan Engineering will help provide breakthrough engineering that will change lives for the better. You can help make an impact via these strategic funds:

  • The Michigan Engineering Fund supports the College’s highest priority initiatives. It provides seed money for faculty to collaborate with each other and launch new programs, funding for student organizations and teams to purchase equipment and travel to national competitions, and resources for students to graduate with the skills necessary to work in the global STEM workforce.
  • The Michigan Engineering Fund – Scholarships provides over $450,000 in annual need- and merit-based scholarships.
  • The Engineering Student Emergency Fund enables the College to support our students’ most urgent needs, including technology, health and wellness, transportation and more.
  • The Engineering Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Initiatives Fund helps create a vibrant and inclusive climate within the College by providing opportunities for education and by providing opportunities for all members of our community to seek their full potential.

Donor support makes an immediate and positive impact on our engineering community by enabling groundbreaking research and opportunities for the next generation of engineers. I invite you to show your support with a gift today.

Whether you give every month or once per year, your support ensures that Michigan Engineering sets the standard for interdisciplinary research and educational excellence.

Sincerely,

Alec D. Gallimore Signature

Alec D. Gallimore, Ph.D.
Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering
Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Professor of Engineering
Arthur F. Thurnau Professor

 

 

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