Portrait of Dean DuBois Bowman SPH Logo

F. DuBois Bowman

Dean
University of Michigan School of Public Health

This year has been the most unpredictable and dynamic in the history of Michigan Public Health. All members of our community, including students, faculty, staff, alumni, donors — you — have experienced a year that no one could have predicted. While the world battled a pandemic, our nation erupted once again to demand change from the injustices caused by systemic racism. In a year of uncertainty, there is something that I am sure of: Michigan Public Health has made an impact. 

We provided emergency support, developed resources via testing and modeling, aided policy, and served as a leader in health and safety from the campus to the state capital. These efforts, and much more, were made possible thanks to alumni and donor support. Through your engagement and philanthropy, you have enabled us to keep moving forward. However, we still need your help. At this important moment, I ask that you continue to show your support and help us pursue a healthier, more equitable world by making a gift to Michigan Public Health.

As a top 5 school of public health, we serve as a resource on campus, in the state of Michigan, nationally, and internationally. Our efforts have helped policymakers, businesses, and individuals better understand today’s challenges and how we move forward safely. Other efforts led by our experts, like surveillance testing, regional modeling, and test development, were in part made possible from donor support. You help fuel this collaborative environment and culture. Gifts from our alumni and friends ensure we continue to remain flexible and advocate for those who may not be able to do so.

We have faced incredible change, entering a new normal with more variables. But there are still constants that remain — the breadth and depth of impact from our students, faculty, and researchers. When the coronavirus arrived in the state of Michigan, the university relied on the expertise of the School of Public Health to mobilize its response. We were positioned well for these efforts because of the foundation of research and execution we’ve built, long before SARS-CoV-2. From Jonas Salk’s world-changing polio vaccine to Professor Arnold Monto’s major study of the effectiveness of the influenza vaccine that helped convince Medicare policymakers to make the flu vaccine a covered benefit, Michigan Public Health’s collective commitment  has  ignited innovation and positive impact. As dean, I am honored to steward that commitment. We have stepped up when we were needed the most, and donor support helped make all of this possible.

Michigan Public Health students have shown incredible resilience during this year, and support from alumni and donors like you has afforded dozens of students thousands of dollars in financial aid. One student, Carmelita Perrien Naccarato, can pursue her mission as an advocate for all thanks to donor support. Carmelita conducts research, serves as a student ambassador, volunteers in the Emergency Medicine Department at Michigan Medicine, and teaches Detroit high school students how to be champions of healthy communities, all while achieving academic excellence. She received a need-based scholarship to help her activity at the U-M Spectrum Center as a staunch advocate in the LGBTQ+ community, and uses that to aid her passion for public health and health equity. By donating to Michigan Public Health, you are directly impacting the experience and wellness of a future public health leader.

Much of what we accomplish is designed to go unnoticed by the public we serve. But our strength as a school is rooted in the expertise of our faculty and their immense contributions to our collective well-being. Associate Professor of Epidemiology Emily Martin, an infectious disease expert, builds a greater understanding of respiratory illnesses and how to identify strategies to reduce transmission through her epidemiological research. She was one of the many faculty members who helped determine how to keep workers, customers, and citizens safe. Our school has been active in this field for decades, and you can help strengthen our ability to support local and federal government, take action and affect policy, and enable people to take care of themselves when they’re sick.

What we do now affects not only today, but tomorrow, which is why we must start today not only to address the current pandemic but to better prepare for—and ideally prevent—future pandemics. I ask that you give now to help us create meaningful, lasting impact.

Sincerely,

F. DuBois Bowman Signature

Dean F. DuBois Bowman
University of Michigan School of Public Health

 

We provided emergency support, developed resources via testing and modeling, aided policy, and served as a leader in health and safety from the campus to the state capital. These efforts, and much more, were made possible thanks to alumni and donor support. Through your engagement and philanthropy, you have enabled us to keep moving forward. However, we still need your help. At this important moment, I ask that you continue to show your support and help us pursue a healthier, more equitable world by making a gift to Michigan Public Health.

As a top 5 school of public health, we serve as a resource on campus, in the state of Michigan, nationally, and internationally. Our efforts have helped policymakers, businesses, and individuals better understand today’s challenges and how we move forward safely. Other efforts led by our experts, like surveillance testing, regional modeling, and test development, were in part made possible from donor support. You help fuel this collaborative environment and culture. Gifts from our alumni and friends ensure we continue to remain flexible and advocate for those who may not be able to do so.

We have faced incredible change, entering a new normal with more variables. But there are still constants that remain — the breadth and depth of impact from our students, faculty, and researchers. When the coronavirus arrived in the state of Michigan, the university relied on the expertise of the School of Public Health to mobilize its response. We were positioned well for these efforts because of the foundation of research and execution we’ve built, long before SARS-CoV-2. From Jonas Salk’s world-changing polio vaccine to Professor Arnold Monto’s major study of the effectiveness of the influenza vaccine that helped convince Medicare policymakers to make the flu vaccine a covered benefit, Michigan Public Health’s collective commitment  has  ignited innovation and positive impact. As dean, I am honored to steward that commitment. We have stepped up when we were needed the most, and donor support helped make all of this possible.

Michigan Public Health students have shown incredible resilience during this year, and support from alumni and donors like you has afforded dozens of students thousands of dollars in financial aid. One student, Carmelita Perrien Naccarato, can pursue her mission as an advocate for all thanks to donor support. Carmelita conducts research, serves as a student ambassador, volunteers in the Emergency Medicine Department at Michigan Medicine, and teaches Detroit high school students how to be champions of healthy communities, all while achieving academic excellence. She received a need-based scholarship to help her activity at the U-M Spectrum Center as a staunch advocate in the LGBTQ+ community, and uses that to aid her passion for public health and health equity. By donating to Michigan Public Health, you are directly impacting the experience and wellness of a future public health leader.

Much of what we accomplish is designed to go unnoticed by the public we serve. But our strength as a school is rooted in the expertise of our faculty and their immense contributions to our collective well-being. Associate Professor of Epidemiology Emily Martin, an infectious disease expert, builds a greater understanding of respiratory illnesses and how to identify strategies to reduce transmission through her epidemiological research. She was one of the many faculty members who helped determine how to keep workers, customers, and citizens safe. Our school has been active in this field for decades, and you can help strengthen our ability to support local and federal government, take action and affect policy, and enable people to take care of themselves when they’re sick.

What we do now affects not only today, but tomorrow, which is why we must start today not only to address the current pandemic but to better prepare for—and ideally prevent—future pandemics. I ask that you give now to help us create meaningful, lasting impact.

Sincerely,

F. DuBois Bowman Signature

Dean F. DuBois Bowman
University of Michigan School of Public Health

 

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